If you’ve ever talked to an influencer at length about working with brands you inevitably hear horror stories of being asked to work several hours to create great content only to be offered free product samples as payment. That, coupled with the more insidious problem of unfair pay among races and genders and the influencer marketing industry is just screaming for some equilibrium.

Enter Lindsey Lee, a former model and workwear fashion influencer who was fed up up with brands undervaluing the contribution of influencers and content creators. She started a new site in late December called F*** You Pay Me. She calls it like a Glassdoor for influencers.

Lindsey Lee on Winfluence

FYPM, as she refers to it for polite conversation, is an effort in transparency. Influencers review the brands they’ve collaborated with, including how much they were paid, what they were asked to do and how the brand was to work with. They also give their demographic information. Brand report cards then show up that reveal how they pay and behave.

Lee has safeguards built in so no influencer is outed—all reviews posted are anonymous—and no brand is unfairly railroaded. A brand’s report card doesn’t get unlocked until it has at least 10 reviews on the site.

The app is brand new—its minimum viable product launched in late December. It eclipsed 500 brand reviews in late February. 

Lee joined me on Winfluence to talk about the reasons behind it, who it benefits beyond just influencers and, of course, the controversial name. I even asked her if the abrasiveness of it concerned her as she thought about ways to monetize the site and potentially partner with brands.

We also talked about her insistence on having site users share their demographic data so FYPM could be a tool to help close the influencer pay gap.

Note: We speak freely on Winfluence, so this episode contains language some people may find offensive. It is limited to the discussion of the name of the website.

This episode of Winfluence, the podcast, is sponsored by Winfluence, the book! Get a special discount by clicking the button below, buying on the Entrepreneur Press bookstore and using the discount code FALLS20. That earns you 20% off the retail price, just for being a Winfluence (the podcast) listener. Read and learn why we’ve been backed into a corner to think influencer marketing means Instagram and YouTube and how reframing it to be “influence” marketing makes us smarter marketers.


Winfluence - Reframing Influencer Marketing to Ignite Your Brand

Order Winfluence now!

This episode of Winfluence, the podcast, is sponsored by Winfluence, the book! Get a special discount by clicking the button below, buying on the Entrepreneur Press bookstore and using the discount code FALLS20. That earns you 20% off the retail price, just for being a Winfluence (the podcast) listener. Read and learn why we’ve been backed into a corner to think influencer marketing means Instagram and YouTube and how reframing it to be “influence” marketing makes us smarter marketers.


Winfluence Transcript – Lindsey Lee – F*** You Pay Me

Jason Falls
Hello again friends. Thanks for listening to Winfluence – The Influence Marketing Podcast. You’ve heard me say before the influence marketing industry is really in its infancy. The first real maturation of the influence tools and perspectives on categorizing influencers differently is less than six months old. The technology and our thinking about influencers is evolving every day. Add to the natural growth of a technology based ecosystem, the issues of the influencer pay gap, which is mostly centered around fairness and pay for influencers of color, but also the pay gap between the genders and you have a baby of an industry taking its first steps and scraping into your elbow or two along the way. But that evolution breeds opportunity and one influencer out there saw one and seized it. Lindsey Lee started a brand review website where influencers can post reviews of the brand collaborations they have. The site is called Fuck You Pay Me. Lee refers to it as FYPM for more polite conversation. But we don’t put up guard rails on this show. so be warned you’ll hear another F-bomb or two in the discussion.

Jason Falls
FYPM is meant to be an effort in transparency, where influencers can honestly review brands they work with. So other influencers can know everything from how nice they are, to how much they pay, and even how they treat different genders and races. The in your face name has earned Lee’s new company fast attention from influencers, brands and investors. It just received its first funding and was invited into an accelerator program literally last week. The app is brand new, its minimum viable product launched in late December. It eclipsed 500 brand reviews in late February. Lee joined me on Winfluence to talk about the reasons behind it, who had benefits beyond just influencers and of course the controversial name. I even asked her if the abrasiveness of it concerned her as she thought about ways to monetize the site and potentially partner with brands. We also talked about her insistence on having site users share their demographic data, so FYPM could be a tool to maybe help close the influencer pay gap.

Jason Falls
Lee is a former freelance model and workwear style influencer in her own right. She also has experience working on the social media agency side of the business, choosing influencers for the brand she represented. But her educational background in finance led her down the path of building something new to add to the ever growing influence marketing space. Curious about it all? Fuck You Pay Me and Lindsey Lee are next on Winfluence.

Jason Falls
Support for this episode of Winfluence – The Influence Marketing Podcast is brought to you by Winfluence the book. Winfluence – Reframing Influencer Marketing to Ignite Your Brand is available now from Entrepreneur Press. You can find it in bookstores everywhere, but I’ll have a special place to go online and get a discount in just a second so get ready to jot down a note. This week’s five star review of influence comes from Amazon and longtime friend Tania Dakka, who is an advertising copywriter.

Jason Falls
She wrote, “Jason Falls did a fantastic job of differentiating between influence and influencer and broke down how Winfluence is applicable to all levels of business. He uncovers how to strategically think about Winfluence and the impact it can have. If you’ve ever thought you wouldn’t know how to even approach someone who could be an influencer for your business. The answers are here. I especially loved the chapter on measuring the success of a campaign with someone of influence. Very excited to put these tactics into play. If you are ready to grow your audience, you need this book.”

Jason Falls
Thanks Tania. If you’ve read the book and would like your review, read on the show review the book on Amazon. I’ll select the most interesting ones to read here and I will certainly read more than just five star reviews as long as your criticism is constructive. That’s fair and I will appreciate it greatly. For those of you who don’t yet have your copy of Winfluence you can get it on Amazon but if you want a 20% discount just go to jason.online/buywinfluence. That’s the books page at Entrepreneur Press, my publisher. There you can enter the code FALLS20 and receive 20% off the retail price. The address again is jason.online/buywinfluence the code is all caps FALLS20. Oh, and regardless of where you buy the book I could still use those Amazon reviews so please review the book there when you’re done. Again jason.online/buywinfluence. Get Started reframing influencer marketing to ignite your brand today.

Jason Falls
Okay, Lindsay, let’s start with the reason you started Fuck You Pay Me because I think that informs the conversation nicely. What was the impetus for a review site for brands and they’re influential partnerships,

Lindsey Lee
I created FYPM because it’s something I always wanted when I was first started influencing when I was freelance modeling. I’ve had the idea forever, I just, I’m not a tech person. So I never knew how to actually make it happen. But when I went to business school, and I learned more about capital markets and entrepreneurship, and I started talking to other people who built this sort of thing before, um, you just kind of figure it out, and I wanted it to exist, so I’m gonna make it exist. A lot of creative people I know who are like full creator, full freelancer, they haven’t had, like, they don’t really like know what it’s like to have a glass door for anything, you know, because they’ve just always done that type of work. So it is kind of hard to like, it’s definitely more difficult to like, explain on like, the business side, like people who don’t do this type of work, like why it’s a need. Um, but most people like once I explain it, they get it, but most people just never think like, about the other side. You know, people, people like to think about themselves naturally.

Jason Falls
Now, I one thing that I find really interesting here that I think also contextualize is the conversation is when you’re when we talked last week, I think it was, I was really impressed by how much you brought up. And you’ve already brought it up here. You brought up freelancers. So how much of this is really built for freelancers versus specifically for influencers?

Lindsey Lee
Oh, it’s, it’s for both I I want to expand it to freelancers, you can apply this model. Anything that brands out sourced for freelancers, outsource to freelancers for pennies is fair game, in my opinion, like, we all like, we all think we’re competing with each other. But we’re not like we can help each other. I mean, you can compete with each other a little bit. But at the end of the day, like you go to someone for creative work, because there’s something about that particular person that you want in need, like you can’t really like interchange the to like no two are exactly the same. It’s not a commodity. And like influencing is not a commodity content creation isn’t a commodity. Now there’s like graphic design, or …

Jason Falls
I think this is an interesting way to bring a little bit more of the non commodity, the non commoditization of freelance work, because I think platforms like Fiverr, and whatnot have a tendency to commoditize it. And so that’s kind of, you know, lowered it to the least common denominator. And it seems like this is trying to build it back up a bit.

Lindsey Lee
Exactly. That’s exactly right. Like, everything else out there is built thinking about business needs first, and then they try to get the creative skill, and then eventually, it becomes the only like, the main place where you can get jobs. And then whoever, whoever that platform was built for becomes kind of like the king, you know, and a lot of like FYPM is about, like helping people realize, like, Hey, we’re it takes two to tango, we’re not actually like, as powerless as we feel, you know, we can help each other, we can make this type of work, not reserved, just for like the privilege who can afford to like not be paid. You know, right before the pandemic popped off. I was like, I had all these interviews, and I had an interview with this ad agency in New York. And they’re like, you’re great. We want you, you know, for like to run, I was gonna run like one of the like, it was a different consumer brands like Twitter account, and they’re like, you’re great. How much do you want to be paid? Like, what are your salary requirements? And I was like, Oh, well, it’s New York. So I think I’d at least need like, like, 125k you know, to live. That sounds good to me. And they’re like, Oh, we were thinking like, something completely different. And I was like, like, what? And they’re like, 45 and I was like, 45 I was like, people moved to New York City for 45k. Like, I don’t think I can afford to rent an apartment. You know, on that. I was like, I was like up in that. And then I really threw off the interview like, like the lady who was interviewing me because I was like, really move to New York City for 45k. And she was like, she was like, look for some people to drink. moved to New York City. And I was like, Oh my god, no, not me. I need to live. Like, I can’t, like, I can’t do that. Are you crazy. And then she like, basically hung up the phone on me. And I thought that was funny. I was just like Jesus, like, that’s just wild. So that’s, that’s also another reason why I want to extend it to all freelancers to like show social media managers, it’s a full time job. It’s, it’s hard to like you have to like, you have to plan but you also have to be able to react in real time and say intelligent things, you know, like you got to be present, you got to be funny, you know, it’s not thinkless, like a lot of people think, and a lot of people think these types of jobs are thinkless a lot of time, because they just happen around them. And people see the final product, and they’re like, oh, like, you know, they see one Instagram post, and they forget that behind the Instagram post is like, years of building up your audience. And, you know, like, building that trust in like planning. And, like, if you hire a photographer, like photography, or if you do it yourself, and like the makeup and the setup, you have to think about how like, looks and feels with all your other content, like it has to make sense. And it’s hard to take someone else’s product and make it makes sense with who you are as a person, you know. And if you if you’re all about the product too much, then people don’t believe you. You know. So like, it’s like, you have to be careful with who you partner with.

Jason Falls
Let me let me chime in here and and fill you in on something that’s both in, in your defense, but also perhaps to better inform the agency negotiation you had there. I want moved to New York City for $40,000 a year. But that was 25 years ago. So it happened. But that i would i would agree that your agency folks, there were probably a low balling the payment on that particular salary position. So okay, I know that, you know, when you were working as a social media manager, at one point, you were also and you had been a freelance model. And you had been an influencer, you had built a degree of following online, as well. So you had that perspective, and you’re working as a social media manager. And at one point, I think you said, you were also frustrated that some of the tools for influencer marketing even have an option two, you know, let’s filter only influencers, who will accept product for payment. So tell me a little bit about that frustration, and how that led to all this?

Lindsey Lee
Ah, well, that was just like, it was like an aha moment. For me. I was like, I can’t believe that. I mean, I can’t, I mean, like, also, coming from a finance background, I can kind of believe it. Like, I know, business is trying to get away with anything. And this goes back to like, these platforms being built for brands, if you can build something that helps, I’m doing air quotes right now, that helps influencers get jobs, that allows the job maker to only find people who are willing to work for free, that that’s like a decision, that’s a big decision right there, you know, and it drives down the value for everyone. That becomes the new standard. And that is kind of like what’s happening right now. And I see fyp was like a way to, like, put it throw a wrench in that argument. You know, like, if people know, that, like somebody got paid several thousands of dollars, like, they’re gonna want the all the people who got nothing are gonna want answers, you know? Yeah, no, that was that was frustrating. That was like, kind of heartbreaking. I was like, I felt kind of powerless, like when I saw that, and I mean, like, I was on the other side, too. But like, again, most people don’t ever like, most people don’t get to experience both sides.

Jason Falls
So let me play devil’s advocate a little bit here, though not not every influencer is in it to get paid money. Some especially coupon bloggers, and some beauty influencers, actually rely on the free product samples to give them reasons to create content. And so from a brand perspective, some don’t necessarily some influencers even don’t have necessarily the right audience size or engagement or reach levels to justify spending cash on top of product. So is there not room for the micro nano influencer in the ecosystem that doesn’t necessarily, you know, either warrant or want or need to get paid?

Lindsey Lee
Oh, yeah, absolutely. Like I’m at like FYPM is never going to tell anyone what to do. How much you get paid is absolutely a personal decision. Um, the industry is going in a direction where it’s like it’s become like more of an expectation and that is what I have a problem with. And that being said, like I had, I was a brand ambassador, a brand ambassador for this one person. And Sarah Flint they it’s like a luxury shoe brand. And I got I got free shoes and I loved that program like I really did, I left them a really awesome review in like, but they had a lot of perks like we had, like, we had like a whole like community together of like workwear bloggers. And then like before COVID I got, like, I would get invited to like really cool parties in New York with like, celebrities and stuff. They were like, they were perks, you know, um, and I enjoyed that. But that was my personal decision, what, what’s really like, what really I have a problem with is when brands, you know, a lot of times brands will approach you. And then if you don’t want the free product, they’ll be really hostile, and they’ll they’ll just be rude. And then it’s just like, like, no, like, if you’re approaching me for a job, you’re asking me to do something, if I tell you this is how much it is, you can’t be angry that I want to be paid for it. That is me. Um, but yeah, no, I mean, there is a place for it, it just, it just depends, you know, on who you are and what you want. And a lot of times like, I’m like, man, I made this diagram. And it’s, it’s like how to answer the question, How much should I charge? And there’s like three different pillars, and one is who you are? Who’s asking, and what do they want? And it’s all about, like, opportunity cost, you know, and like, the things that like, who is asking that goes into, like, what is their brand power? What will this partnership do for you, because for a lot of the times, like it will do something for you. It’ll make sense, you know, and that would like drive your price up or down depending on how well they naturally fit and how how much their brand can do for you. And I think that’s why, like, we’ve definitely seen a trend in the data, you know, the, like startups, by far tend to pay the most, and I think a lot of that has to do with, they have so little brand power, so they don’t have any of that. And then a lot of the bigger companies who actually could afford to pay a lot more, don’t really pay a lot. And I think part of that is like they’re still relying on the exposure thing, like the brand power thing. But and then another part is just like business trying to do business. But the the exposure thing, like that works more like with the old algorithm in like 2015 I don’t think people necessarily look to brands anymore to see like who’s like in the in crowd who’s popular. It’s kind of like, the script is like, billet now. It’s like people look to like influencers to see what brands are cool. So that’s kind of that’s that’s how I think, imagine it.

Jason Falls
Let’s well I guess while I’m pushing back here a little let’s talk about the name. You’ve been very diplomatic and calling it FYPM. But but the name of the the, the company the app is Fuck You Pay Me. Now for for purposes of decency, it’s F, you know, asterisk, asterisk, asterisk, you pay me, but everybody looks at it knows exactly what they’re saying, right? Now, it’s an attention getter for sure. But from a brand or an agency perspective, are you concerned at all that they might find it abrasive because it has a vibe about it? That’s very, it’s either diva-esque, or perhaps confrontational, which I’m guessing in on either side of that description, many brands would just rather not deal with it. Is that a concern for you?

Lindsey Lee
No. like I said, at, like, I like FYPM is for creators first, brand second. There’s like brands already have a lot of options, you know, to find influencers. Um, and I mean, they’re gonna have to go where the talent wants to go, if I can create a product and a place where that like, you know, the creators actually, you know, help each other and enjoy and get use data, then, then they’ll just have to deal with it. You know, there’s these two, I mean, it’s just, it’s a name a lot of people, I think, think I’m, I like think I come off as a little abrasive initially, but when you get to know me, like, I’m pretty, I’m pretty cool. I’m pretty chill. I just, I want, I want people to be happy. I want good relationships with people. I’m just, you know, that’s just who I am. So a little bit of that was me, inserting my personality into my brand. That’s fair. I get that.

Jason Falls
But, um, but I’m guessing eventually, you’re going to want to monetize this thing, right? You’re building a company, you’re not building a hobby. So let’s say you have a way eventually for brands or agencies to post job listings or like glass door, you You can, you can potentially allow companies to populate content on a profile page of their own where they they can represent themselves to the community. And that can be how you drive revenue, does it concern you that when you get to the point where you’re going to have to turn to brands for money, the site is literally saying to them, fuck you. And those are the people you’re asking money for money from?

Lindsey Lee
No, I think I think time will show like who we are and what we’re about. And we really are all on the same side, I just don’t see that as an issue. I don’t know, this is my opinion. I mean, I’ve already had a lot of brands express interest in a lot of like, especially a lot of smaller ones, who want to do the right thing, or who like want to be like good partners. But also, on that note, like, a lot of our reviews are positive, like the good brands that come out of this when they get unlocked. And everybody sees how how, like all the amazing things influencers are saying about them. Um, and it’s not all about money to a lot of it comes down to like, Are they good to work with? Are they going to pay you on time Are they going to try to like change the rules at the end are they going to do what they say they’re going to do and be responsive, and all that, that has a lot to do with it too. And when those brands come out in the positive light, I think FYPM is going to help those brands, get more influencers or get like, have more options, like have more power, you know, so it’s really, it’s really just about balancing the power here through transparency. And then I my hope is that over time, like, the brands that suck, it will be like, they will have to pay more, because it’ll be more difficult for them to get people to work with them. And then the ones that don’t suck, they will have more options, and it will naturally you know, it’ll it’ll run its course, you know, it’s Yeah, mostly, like most of our reviews are positive, I don’t think. And then, you know, you can even imagine a scenario where brands try to like, you know, like, encourage the influencers that they have good relationships with to go on and leave reviews, you know, that would be cool. I don’t I don’t know of any who have done that yet. Right now, I think they’re still afraid because of the name. But I think over time that I could, I could change once they start seeing like the benefits of like the good ones, I think though, that’ll change so, but this isn’t just about like connecting brands to influencers. I’m like, I want to create a research portal, where reporters can look at not never individual reviews, but like aggregate insights, or not just reporters, like researchers, universities, um, people doing social justice work, that sort of thing, like, and then I have a couple of other ideas up my sleeve. I’m just kind of waiting to see more what people asked for.

Jason Falls
Okay, so I’m going to stop picking on you and playing devil’s advocate. Now let’s get into the site functionality. So people really understand what’s happening. You have a place where influencers can come and leave a review of a brand they’ve worked with, or freelancers, not just influencers, you ask them for information about themselves. You also ask specific information about the brand partnerships, what they asked you to do, etc. The range of money they paid what the deliverables were, and so on. So demographics are one of the things you ask about the influencers, that means you’re able to show some reporting around race and gender to help keep brands honest there, is that an intentional effort to maybe help, you know, perhaps close the influence or pay gap for race or for gender? Or for both?

Lindsey Lee
Yes, absolutely. Absolutely. It is, um, I am a huge fan of Caroline Criado Perez, and she wrote this awesome book called Invisible Women – Data Bias in a World Built for Men. And basically, I think I like I feel like it should be required reading for any tech, any tech founder, executive leader. And the basically, the, the point of like, the thesis of the book is not collecting the data is the worst thing you can do for gender equality, or, you know, race equality or like, you know, disability bias, like, like sexual orientation, all that sort of stuff, like not having the data is tends to make things a lot worse. So I don’t think I have all the answers. You know, I’m not a data scientist. At some point. I would love to maybe hire a team of data scientists to try to work this out, but I’m collecting it so I can give that to the people who are the experts in the industry and help with that initiative because that is something that is very important to me. And it’s something I built my audience on Miss young professional on. And I, knowing what I know that not having the data is the worst thing you can do, I’m not going to do that. So that’s why I asked us questions.

Jason Falls
Now, this, this site could be a godsend, really, for influencers who don’t know how much to charge and maybe want, you know, a recommendation on how a given brand is to work with him, but I assume, you know, that’s certainly the main point, how do you intend to get in front of more influencers to you know, show them that they’ve got this fabulous new tool out there, they can use?

Lindsey Lee
Well, so far, all of our growth has really come from like, word of mouth, I haven’t done really, I think I tried paid ads, like twice, but it’s, I mean, I have some ideas on how to reach more, eventually, I’m just waiting until like, we have more than the MVP to do that. But like, I’m thinking about partnering with some agencies, some other third party platforms that do more like media kit type stuff and like, like that are more hands on with trying to get influencers jobs, like I’m not I’m never going to try to construct a control the exchange of dollars or tell people I can get them jobs, like I’m like a marketplace and I’m thinking about partnering with some of those people. And you know, but just you know, right now I’m in the stage of like, I’m trying to establish a relationship and see what they’re all about. And I’m also going undercover and testing some of their products. You know, I don’t want to ever recommend anything, I wouldn’t feel comfortable using myself. I and identified a couple like key players, you know, like influencers who are active in the pay equity conversation, as potential partners for the future when I when I do get some more funding and I can put that money down, you know, to get some influential players, you know, never gonna ask someone to do something for me and not pay them with a company called Fuck You Pay Me. I can’t do that. You know, I’m like, right now I’m more I sound a little scattered great scatterbrained. But right now a little bit more focused just on like perfect, or not perfecting improving what we have now the usefulness to our existing users. While making the master plan to like for the actual app.

Jason Falls
You do have a nice protection built in there to ensure that a brand doesn’t just get hammered out of the gate, tell us a little bit about unlocking the brand. So that the brand people out there listening, understand this isn’t just let’s throw brands under the bus and you know, in an app.

Lindsey Lee
okay, so anyone can log on, and leave a review for brand. But nobody will know that that review is for that brand, until that specific brand has at least 10 reviews. And we do this to give the brand a fair shot and also to protect the identity of the influencer and typically takes a while for a brand to become unlocked. The point of this is about transparency, which is about truth. And we want to we don’t want influencers, to feel pressured to leave a review in a certain way. We want them to give their like to honestly give their experience.

Jason Falls
So there’s no fear in for an influencer, who goes there and leaves a review. There’s no fear that a brand is going to know who they are. Right?

Lindsey Lee
Yeah. And a lot of times people like if you do if you are good influencer A lot of times, like a lot of the reviews will be like the follower bracket. Like we take we ask you the following you had at the time when you worked with a brand. And a lot of times that’ll change especially on the micro level they’ll be in a completely other level, you know, and then I’m also like, yeah, if I you have to be an influencer to get in for that specific reason. Like if I find out someone is doing something bad or is like just trying to get people in trouble, you know, for anything they say on the app, like I have the power to kick them out. And that’s also why I like I asked you to tell me at least one of your social handles before I let you in, you know because I need to be able to make sure you’re legit like you are who you say you are and I do check everyone someone tried to get in this past weekend and they really made me They left a fake review. And then I knew it was fake because it was kind of crazy. But then I checked their account and they put like, like at like Jack for their Twitter account. And like all these other random, like famous people, you know who were all different famous people on every different social accounts, so I kicked them out and I threw away that review too, because it obviously wasn’t real. Yeah, it’s so there is some there is accountability on both sides like you, you have to at least be honest with me or with FYI cam to the community about who you are. And you have to be honest about your experience. Because transparency doesn’t work. If you have an agenda. It’s just supposed to be the truth.

Jason Falls
So in the short time that I’ve known you, I know we’ve we’ve had a couple of conversations already. And obviously I wrote a little piece about FYPM for Entrepreneur, which was fun to do to get to know you a little bit and help spread the word. But I understand things are starting to move fast. Tell me about the the latest news for the for the business.

Lindsey Lee
Well, I got accepted into an accelerator program, and we got our first investment. So that’s exciting. And I will be moving to Taiwan for about 10 weeks. On Friday. It’s Monday, by the way, everyone.

Jason Falls
That so that’s a huge that’s a huge move, though. I mean, you’re not only you got accepted into an accelerator program and got funding, which is fantastic. But the accelerator program happens to be taking you halfway around the world. That’s, that’s huge.

Lindsey Lee
Hey, if you would have told me a year ago, that I was headed to the Taiwanese embassy to get a business visa for my corporation called Fuck You Pay Me? I’d think you were crazy.

Jason Falls
A year ago COVID was breaking out. So yeah, you brought everybody would have thought you were crazy.

Lindsey Lee
Exactly. Exactly.

Jason Falls
I’m excited for you and glad that, you know, I you know, stumbled across FYPM, I told you that Allen Marler, kind of my right hand guy at Cornett found that one day and just sent me a link to and said, “Have you seen this? This actually looks really cool.” And that’s how I discovered you. So I’m glad that I found you early on. And I hope that the the app continues to grow and the site continues to get better and, and I know it will. So thanks for letting us be a part of your journey.

Lindsey Lee
Yeah, thank you. Thank you, Jason. I’m excited. And I’m excited to share with you our progress along the way.

Jason Falls
Awesome. Well, we’re definitely going to be following along. tell people where they can find you and tell people where they can find the app if they are an influencer and how they can get hooked up with you.

Lindsey Lee
Okay, well, you can find me. I’m @msyoungprofessional on Instagram. It’s mostly a comedy, so be prepared to giggle and you can find FYPM on Instagram at @fypm.vip and the link to our app is in the bio there and then also our website is www.fypm.vip.

Jason Falls
Thanks for spending some time with us.

Lindsey Lee
Yeah, thank you.

Transcribed by otter.ai

The Winfluence theme music is “One More Look” featuring Jacquire King and Stephan Sharp by The K Club found on Facebook Sound Collection.


Winfluence - Reframing Influencer Marketing to Ignite Your Brand

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This episode of Winfluence, the podcast, is sponsored by Winfluence, the book! Get a special discount by clicking the button below, buying on the Entrepreneur Press bookstore and using the discount code FALLS20. That earns you 20% off the retail price, just for being a Winfluence (the podcast) listener. Read and learn why we’ve been backed into a corner to think influencer marketing means Instagram and YouTube and how reframing it to be “influence” marketing makes us smarter marketers.

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